sunshine hours

January 17, 2013

Sunshine Way Up in USA From 1996 to 2011

Filed under: Sunshine,surface solar radiation — sunshinehours1 @ 6:55 AM
Tags:

“A paper published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Atmospheres finds that due to a decrease in cloud cover, solar radiation has significantly increased over the US from 1996 to 2011. The authors note the change in longwave (infrared) surface radiation “dwarfs the [alleged contribution] from the increase of CO2 during the analysis period.” According to the paper, the natural variability due to changes in sunshine has had 4.4 times greater effect on surface radiation than increased greenhouse gases since 1996″

Read the rest at The Hockey Schtick.

 

As I’ve said numerous times, clean air legislation has cleaned the air, meaning less sunshine is reflected back into space, and more sunshine reaches the ground and causes warming.

 

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3 Comments »

  1. These sunshine hour and surface radiation papers are extremely important, as they provide an estimate of climate sensitivity over time periods of more than a decade. Data from NREL allows calculating climate sensitivity over a 6 month period by comparing winter vs summer TSI and temperatures. This gives 0.085 C/W/m^2 for the U.S.

    So, we have a 0.085 C/W/m^2 over 0.5 years. The above paper gives 0.0 C/W/m^2 over 15 years for U.S.
    For Spain, from a previous posting, we have 0.07 C/W/m^2 over 25 years.
    Globally, from another previous post, we have 0.05 C/W/m^2 over 20 years.

    This is pretty conclusively showing a climate sensitivity to doubled CO2 (3.7 W/m^2) of <0.4 C, over climate-relevant time periods.

    Comment by chris y — January 17, 2013 @ 8:37 AM | Reply

  2. “0.0 C/W/m^2 over 15 years for U.S”

    Didn’t you mean 12.3W/m^2?

    Comment by sunshinehours1 — January 17, 2013 @ 9:05 AM | Reply

  3. The paper claims there was no temperature change over the time period of the forcing. I also checked USHCN and found the same thing. So, the temperature change was 0.0 C in response to a forcing increase of 12.3 W/m^2. Therefore, the sensitivity is 0.0 C per W/m^2.

    Comment by chris y — January 17, 2013 @ 11:29 AM | Reply


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