sunshine hours

January 1, 2014

Antarctic Sea Ice Extent Stats For 2013

Filed under: Antarctic Sea Ice — sunshinehours1 @ 8:13 AM
Tags: ,

2013 was a banner year for Antarctic Sea Ice Extent. I enjoy my small role in publicizing this data because the “climate science” profession prefers to ignore Antarctic Sea Ice. Of course it is a little harder for the MSM to ignore Antarctica this year when a ship of “scientists” searching for publicity about lower sea ice caused by “global warming” get stuck in the ice.

The highest maximum for Antarctic Sea Ice Extent of all time was set on October 1st 2013.

The highest average anomaly for a year occurred in 2013. 2013 averaged 850,000 sq km above the 1981-2010 mean.

In 2013, the highest extent ever in each month occurred in July, August, September, October and November.

2013 now has the 2nd highest number of daily records (behind 2008).  2013 also has by far the most “Top 2″ days in a year. Only 1979 is left in the list of daily records from before 2000.

Year First Second Top 2
2013 108 149 257
2008 121 29 150
2010 90 42 132
2009 8 33 41
2012 8 22 30
2006 1 26 27
1979 2 12 14
2000 4 3 7
2004 3 4 7

Here are the key stats for each year. Min/Max/Anomaly in millions sq km.

Year Min Max day of Max day of Min Avg Anomaly
1979 2.91521 18.36699 256 48 0.04
1980 2.52686 19.09137 267 57 -0.39
1981 2.69524 18.85906 261 51 -0.21
1982 2.8927 18.55004 246 52 -0.02
1983 2.84656 18.81042 263 55 -0.25
1984 2.38292 18.37747 266 58 -0.2
1985 2.60211 18.93215 254 50 -0.04
1986 2.95395 18.02672 261 65 -0.55
1987 3.01642 18.52332 258 52 -0.24
1988 2.63862 18.78456 277 55 -0.14
1989 2.7229 18.27368 266 51 -0.23
1990 2.78435 18.3788 273 53 -0.24
1991 2.55355 18.66993 273 58 -0.11
1992 2.49238 18.4663 255 54 -0.24
1993 2.28078 18.709 263 50 -0.23
1994 3.08286 18.8266 243 43 0.12
1995 3.32988 18.7353 269 55 0.15
1996 2.59733 18.83039 267 56 0.13
1997 2.26415 18.79094 265 58 -0.26
1998 2.7715 19.2433 258 56 0.08
1999 2.70723 18.98068 273 51 0.11
2000 2.58248 19.15817 272 49 0.11
2001 3.44094 18.49324 271 50 0.02
2002 2.69691 18.11556 252 51 -0.43
2003 3.6257 18.67907 268 48 0.32
2004 3.25927 19.12341 252 51 0.32
2005 2.80387 19.29451 272 49 0.04
2006 2.4866 19.35934 264 51 -0.19
2007 2.7227 19.08545 272 50 0.03
2008 3.69176 18.29726 247 51 0.6
2009 2.67096 19.29864 267 53 0.39
2010 2.8422 18.9968 249 47 0.45
2011 2.31884 18.95328 266 53 -0.15
2012 3.11109 19.47713 266 54 0.36
2013 3.6504 19.57088 274 50 0.85

End of Year Graph

Antarctic_Sea_Ice_Extent_2013_Day_365_1981-2010

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3 Comments »

  1. We need to get away from “sea ice extent” and move to the “integral of sea ice extent”: thickness. I would propose a new measure of actual climate effects: average sea ice thickness x average sea ice area. This new measure {for both the Arctic and Antarctic} would give a more accurate measure of “true coldness and true heat”.

    I am fearful of the future and the effects of a “quiet Sun”. Once the Poles are covered in thick ice, the “cold of space” will no longer be suppressed by the heat from the Equator causing crop failure and other climate extremes in warmer areas.

    A realistic measure is the first step to understanding.

    Dr. Lurtz

    Comment by Dr. Lurtz — January 1, 2014 @ 10:56 AM | Reply

    • There is a new satellite measuring volume (cryosat). But using that new data involves giving up on historical data,

      Extent is a valid measurement. Adding more data will be useful.

      Besides when the AMO goes negative, extent should grow in the north and shrink in the south.

      Comment by sunshinehours1 — January 1, 2014 @ 11:50 AM | Reply

  2. […] 2013 was a banner year for Antarctic Sea Ice Extent'The highest maximum for Antarctic Sea Ice Extent of all time was set on October 1st 2013. The highest average anomaly for a year occurred in 2013. 2013 averaged 850,000 sq km above the 1981-2010 mean' […]

    Pingback by Anonymous — January 5, 2014 @ 4:41 AM | Reply


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